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New School Office of the President commencement records

 Record Group
Identifier: NS-05-05-02

Summary

Collection is comprised of materials relating to The New School for Social Research (now The New School) commencement ceremonies. Includes commencement programs, invitations, lists of degree recipients (including thesis topics), speech transcripts, and correspondence. Also includes materials relating to Parsons School of Design commencement ceremonies from the years 1980 and 1983.

Dates

  • 1946 - 1983

Creator

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research use. National Academy of the Sciences Surveys of Earned Doctorates, 1965-1968 have been redacted to remove confidential student information. The originals are restricted. Please contact archivist@newschool.edu for appointment.

Use Restrictions

To publish images of material from this collection, permission must be obtained in writing from The New School Archives and Special Collections. Please contact: archivist@newschool.edu.

Historical Note

The New School for Social Research was founded in 1919 as an institution of higher education devoted to adult learning. As the school grew into a university, this original division was alternately known as the "Founding Division" or the "Adult Division." In 1943, the school was divided into two schools, the School of Politics, and the School of Liberal Arts and Philosophy. At this time, in response to the needs of returning veterans wishing to take advantage of the GI Bill, the school began a program called Senior Year at the New School. Geared toward adults who had previously completed some coursework, the program offered undergraduate credits for some courses and awarded bachelors' degrees. However, the majority of students continued to take non-credit courses.

Although The New School offered some undergraduate credits beginning in the 1940s, the first full-time day program was not established until 1972. Called the Freshman Year Program, it initially focused on college-level courses for high school students or recent high school graduates, who would then matriculate elsewhere. The program expanded as the Seminar College in 1977 and further grew in 1985 with a large donation and new name, Eugene Lang College.

In 1933, the New School for Social Research established the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science. Also known as the "University in Exile," the division was founded in order to host German and other European scholars who left their countries of origin to escape political and racial persecution. The Board of Regents of the State of New York granted a provisional charter in 1934, allowing the Graduate Faculty to confer Master of Social Science and Doctor of Social Science degrees. This was the first time the New School for Social Research offered credits leading to a degree to students in any of its programs. In 2005, the Graduate Faculty changed its name to The New School for Social Research, reclaiming the founding name of the entire institution, which had been dropped eight years before.

In 1970, Parsons School of Design became affiliated with The New School. The American artist William Merritt Chase founded the school in 1896 as the Chase School of Art. It went through several name changes (New York School of Art, New York School of Fine and Applied Art), but was connected in the public's mind to the school's charismatic president, Frank Alvah Parsons. In 1942, the Board of Trustees officially renamed the school Parsons School of Design.

In 1989, the Mannes College of Music became affiliated with the New School. The school was founded as the David Mannes Music School in 1916 by musicians and educators David Mannes and Clara Damrosch Mannes. It was originally located on Manhattan's Upper East Side, on East 70th Street. In 1938, the school changed its name to the Mannes Music School. In 1953, Mannes began offering degrees, and became the Mannes College of Music.

In 1997, the New School for Social Research was officially renamed New School University. The founding division, still devoted to adult education, was given the general name The New School, now comprising one of seven divisions of New School University. In 2005, the school underwent another series of name changes, which led to the overarching organization being called The New School, while the adult education program was named The New School for General Studies. This name was changed in 2011, when the adult education program was called The New School for Public Engagement and combined with the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy, which until that time had been a separate division.

In 2015, a rebranding of the university resulted in several changes to divisions and names. As of 2018, The New School consists of 5 divisions: The New School for Social Research; the Schools of Public Engagement (including: Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students; Creative Writing Program; Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy; School of Media Studies; and School of Languages); Parsons School of Design; Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts; and College of Performing Arts (combining the Schools of Mannes, Jazz and Drama).

Extent

1.3 Cubic Feet (1 box, 1 folder)

Language of Materials

English

Scope and Contents

This collection is comprised of materials relating to The New School for Social Research (now The New School) commencement ceremonies. Includes lists of degree recipients (including thesis topics), speech transcripts, correspondence with commencement speakers and honorary degree recipients, and planning correspondence. Also includes copies of commencement programs and invitations. Notable commencement speakers include Daniel Patrick Moynihan in 1968 and Jurgen Habermas in 1980 as well as honorary degree recipients such as Camilo Egas in 1962, George Balanchine in 1978, and Berenice Abott in 1981. These files span multiple presidential administrations (Bryn J. Hovde, Hans Simons, Henry David, John R. Everett, and Jonathan Fanton) documenting commencement activities as well as pre-commencement events for the board of trustees. Folders from the years 1965 to 1968 include surveys of earned doctorates detailing the students' educational history as well as employment and post-doctoral plans. Also includes materials relating to Parsons School of Design commencement ceremonies from the years 1980 and 1983. Of note is the folder titled, "Commencement, 1970," with materials indicating that the May commencement ceremony was cancelled.

Organization and Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Other Finding Aids

For selected item-level description and images from the New School Office of the President commencement records, see the New School Archives Digital Collections at http://digitalarchives.library.newschool.edu/index.php/Detail/collections/NS050502

Immediate Source of Acquisition

This record group formed part of an accession from the Office of the President, and was transferred from storage to The New School Archives in 2015.

Related Materials

The New School Archives holds programs and print materials from The New School and Parsons School of Design commencements from 1945-2018 (NS.05.05.01); recordings of some commencement ceremonies from 1959-2008 (NS.07.02.09); and press releases announcing commencement speakers and activities (NS.03.01.07). The New School Publicity Office records (NS.03.01.05) includes materials related to commencement ceremonies, including transcripts of speeches.
Title
Guide to the New School Office of the President commencement records
Status
Completed
Author
New School Archives and Special Collections Staff
Date
November 8, 2018
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin